Monday, 25 July 2016

Common Carder Bumblebee

Had a few Common Carder Bumblebees Bombus pascuorum in my garden today, this is the first time I have noted them in my garden and definitely the first time I have photographed them, or at least tried to! They are a small bumblebee at 10-15mm and gingery coloured, they are also pretty much continuously moving as they forage, they particularly like the lavender and Erysimum 'Bowles Mauve'  in my garden.
Common Carder Bumblebee
Carder Bumblebees earn this name from their habit of combing material together (carding) to create a covering for the cells containing the larvae. They usually create their nests above ground, often in grass tussocks, in old mouse runs through grass, in tangles of vegetation or just under the surface of the soil. Colonies vary in size, and can contain up to 200 workers. Only young queens survive the winter; they establish new nests in spring. The average nest lasts for about 25 weeks.
Common Carder Bumblebee takes off!
There were also good numbers of Buff-tailed Bumblebees and Honey Bees around the lavender bushes.
Buff-tailed Bumblebee

Buff-tailed Bumblebee

Buff-tailed Bumblebee

Honey Bee
There were also quite good numbers of butterflies around today, mainly large and small whites, one or two gatekeepers and meadow browns and one each of speckled wood and Essex skipper.



Essex Skipper

Essex Skipper